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North Star Leaders Podcast

Adriana Gil Miner

Season 2 Episode 8 11 Jun 2024

Transcript

Adriana Gil Miner:

We know enough about the psychology that in today's world and everything we buy, even in business or in the consumer world, is much more a reflection of who you are and your values, so in this world of choice, of choice of many, we choose brands and we choose them based on who we are and values.

Lindsay Pedersen:

The world needs what only your business can bring. And as a leader, it's your job to deliver. But where do you focus? Where do you direct your time, your team, your budget, and your emotional energy? We are learning this together on the North Star Leaders podcast. I'll be talking to purpose-driven leaders about the choices they make to create audacious economic value while also realizing their distinctive purpose. I'm Lindsay Pedersen, Brand Strategist, author of Forging An Ironclad Brand, and host of the North Star Leaders podcast. Let's get to it. Today, I am really happy to be joined by Adri Gil Miner. Adri is CMO at Iterable, the AI-powered customer communication platform. Adri, welcome to the show.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Thank you, Lindsay. So glad to be here.

Lindsay Pedersen:

I'm so glad to have you. To start us off, Adri, what is your favorite thing about what you do?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Oh, that is so easy because I have the incredible fortune of being the target audience, being the customer.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Ooh.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Yes. And so my absolute favorite thing after being... What? An almost 25-year marketer is that I get to be with customers, get to learn about all these brands and what they're doing, their challenges, their ideas, and meet people and just marketers that are really, it's the people behind the brands that I enjoy the most. And by the way, we're just two weeks away from our customer conference that I'm so excited about because it is my absolute favorite. It is also so much work, so I'm in high stress, but it is my absolute favorite to be able to bring a community together, get to know more people that are in the same profession and be able to help their jobs be a little bit better.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Yeah, people like you get to be with your peeps and you get to bring your peeps together.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Absolutely.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Yeah.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Much better said.

Lindsay Pedersen:

No, I love that. So at Iterable, do you have a stated North Star to abide by across the organization? What would you call that?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Yeah, it's actually a really aspirational, our mission is to connect people with the products and services that bring them joy, and that feels like very abstract from customer engagement or a customer communication platform. But if you abstract a little bit from or uplift a little bit from sending an email or a text and the conversion rate and are you're getting all that stuff, really what you're trying to do is just build that connection between brands and people.

And we know enough about the psychology that in today's world and everything we buy, even in business or in the consumer world is much more a reflection of who you are and your values. So in this world of choice, of choice of many, we choose brands and we choose based on who we are and values. So I love that we have that North Star of ultimately it is about creating joyful experience, bringing a little bit of joy and joy can have a lot of nuances to it, but that is ultimately it's about creating that emotional connection between brands and people that build a relationship, that build loyalty and ultimately of course drive business growth.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Yeah. As the CMO, what are some on the ground ways that you use that to filter decisions that you make or allocate resources as the leader of marketing?

Adriana Gil Miner:

I think if we go back to the basis of marketing, there's that old saying that it's half art, half science. That is very much when you bring along a brand like ours, a provider, a technology provider like us that doesn't have a soul and a vision, then it's just technology and tech can be replicated, can be replaced. But I often hear for example, from our customers that it's not just that we have a great product, but that we're great partners.

So that softer side is very important to me. I'm a big believer in building brands, especially when you're smaller and a disruptor to an industry is that the competitive advantage that a small company like us have is really it's people. It's value, it's culture and the partnership. How do you treat what the customer experiences? How do you treat your customers? And that creates word of mouth, creates loyalty, creates advocacy, and that's sort of the secret sauce of how you go to market and challenge establish a legacy market like the customer automation space.

Lindsay Pedersen:

I love that you said especially as a small company or as a company that's disrupting an industry, that brand is important because oftentimes brand is like, "Oh, we don't have the budget for brand," or brand is for big megalithic consumer companies. But you've said it differently, say more about that.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Yeah, that's funny because what is brand? A brand is not just your logo, it's really truly who you are. In today's world, a huge part of your brand is your employees who they are and so of course a brand is also your product or your service, what you offer it is also how you feel and again, the emotions, the intangibles of the brand and so that it is what people feel about you, not what they buy and how much, but it is how they feel about you.

So that intangible, it's not just built through advertising or typically people think about, brand is something that you build over time and everything you do and how you hire and what product you build and how you sound and how force your marketing in the emails you send in everything. If you think about every touch point is an opportunity, it's a branding opportunity.

In B2B, I often say 90% of our interactions with a prospect, it's a sales deck. That's a branding opportunity. It's like people kind of like, "Oh yeah, the website and stuff." I'm like, "But are you paying attention to what your salespeople are saying and what are they presenting? How does your demo look?" Because that is a branding opportunity and that is in most cases, a branding opportunity. They might of course awareness and all that stuff, but once they engage with you, they form an opinion. They have a feeling that they develop with you, and that happens through all the different touch points.

So that's why I don't think branding is not something reserved for big companies. You may have bigger budgets to and perhaps more opportunity to build awareness and positioning with different tactics that you have in a bigger company than a smaller company. But that's something, and I'll say, an example of Tableau, like Tableau, we never did advertising. We never did above the line advertising or traditional one, but I think it's a very strong brand and it was a brand that was built on word of mouth and customer advocacy.

Lindsay Pedersen:

It strikes me, there's sort of a syntax thing going on here where brand can be a noun, like you've been describing the brand of Iterable or the brands that Iterable serves, and then brand can be an adjective, brand marketing tactics, awareness building, top of the funnel tactics and in some ways, it's a bummer that it's the same word that's used for two related but different things because you can be like Tableau and do no formal brand marketing awareness, building tactics, but have an incredible brand that is super value creating and has a lot of heart and soul. And you can also have a business AT&T that does a lot of brand marketing tactics, but what is their heart and soul? I don't know what it is, just as you were describing that, it's interesting. Yeah, brand is not your logo, it's not your advertising. It's all of the ways that the audience feels about your company, which may or may not include touch points like that.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Absolutely. And by the way, it also can happen in all life cycle of companies. We have a recent customer that went out of business, Drizzly, and they sent out an email to close down like, "Hey, we're no longer out of business," type of thing. But it was such a well-crafted email, the copy, it came across with all of their values and it was a thank you email to their customers and it was so memorable. So even when you're going out of business, you have an opportunity to go out in style to go out and who you are and are your values. So I think if for CMOs and brands and CEOs as well, again, if you really think about, I love your thing about noun and adjectives, but as your brand, as truly who you are and use every single opportunity that you have in interacting with your customers to reinforce that, not just automated and let it be because it's a missed opportunity.

Lindsay Pedersen:

What an example, even going out of business, communication can be filled with heart and soul, can be true to the kind of human qualities that the business celebrated and obviously since they're going out of business, they're doing it for reasons that go beyond economic value creation. And it's okay if it's for economic value creation, but there's something more to it than that for them.

I've heard you talk about brand as an amplifier, as an efficiency driver, that it serves this very practical financial role of decreasing the cost of acquiring customers. Say more about that because oftentimes brand, and now I'm going back to using it a little bit as the adjective of brand marketing, it can be thought of as, oh, that's expensive, or that's something that we can't afford to do or that's good, it's all nice, but we don't have time for that kind of... So how do you think about it in a really pragmatic way if you're justifying this for the CFO?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Well, hopefully a CFO can understand, but basically I've done a lot of studies and seen it myself and experienced that it's a logical thing. So for example, when you invest a dollar in direct response or performance or digital marketing like these, put in a Google ad and I get a click and which has a pretty easy attribution or pretty easy ROI to see.

The problem with that dollar is that it costs you a certain amount money if you're not known, right? You don't have awareness. And then if you're known and you're in a hot space, that dollar is going to be less efficient over time because guess what? Your competitors are going to also go against that same target audience and demand and supply. There's just going to be an up market. So what happens? So you're kind of fighting already sort of at the bottom of that knife fight. And so no matter what you do, the dollar, if you only do that, your dollar will be less efficient, so you'll have less ROI over time.

Now, even if you pour more money. So the only way to change that sort of ratio, so what's going to happen over time is like you put a dollar, if it's an emerging market, it's going to give you an ROI. And then so every year you have to go to your CFO, you want 30% more revenue, well you have to increase my budget for, I don't know, 20% or 10%. You always need more to go more, essentially.

So the only way to get that dollar more efficient is that you have to prove the top of funnel, the interested position so that you build the organic, you're not reaching out and push and trying to do all that work, that dollar becomes more efficient if you have word of mouth organic interest. You catch people when they're not looking, when they're thinking about it, and so they skip all that stuff. They skip the ad, they skip the thing, they can go straight into a more essentially qualified, qualified position.

So what you will see is that the scale, basically. The limitation and scale of the ROI on the performance marketing dollar versus a brand dollar. So the brand has the opposite dynamic of performance. At first is really expensive. You're like, "Oh my gosh, I don't know, I did an event or I put my logo in a stadium and I'm IP, and I'm like, I only got three people interested." So again, at first it's very expensive, but over time, your brand dollar will get actually much more, more efficient because you have more awareness, you have positioning, you know where your audience is, you get better targeting and all that stuff.

So that's what happens with the dollar in brand. And so there's an opposite take. And by the way, you also have to take in consideration, actually, I just saw LinkedIn post from the founder of Marketo, and there's also been a couple of articles, think of the New York Times, they were talking from Airbnb about how they moved away and invested in brand.

So we are seeing this in the B2B space. It is funny because B2B is always five years behind B2C, It's like, "Yes, B2C figured this out." There's a ton of performance marketing in B2C, Over the last five years, every brand has gone way smarter about brand advertising, not just with TV ads and stuff because that's already sort of dead, but honestly with social media and influencers and all that, then OTT, much more targeted type of things and those things were starting to carry over to the B2B side of the world because people are tired and not responding as much to the traditional tactics of brand marketing.

Search is down, webinars, gated content is down. So all of those channels are going sort of lower in performance, and the only way to get them lifted is to combine with activities like community-based, content-based advertising like experiential marketing is up, but you can't scale that because it's less reach without the other one. So you have to combine both. And basically a brand dollar helps you increase efficiency of your performance dollar, and a performance dollar helps you the return like the conversion of the brand dollar.

It is a dynamic, and I mean, of course you could build financial models to see models demonstrate, but at the end of the day when you talk to a CFO or a CEO, you have to be able to agree on the logic and I guess the business model of the why, not everybody buys my narrative some other, there's many CEOs and CFOs absolutely see and understand that. So you have to kind of really tailor your pitch. It's so funny, every CMO I talk to, this is the core. Well, yeah. I mean everybody thinks CMOs do a lot of strategy, which we do, but I don't know, maybe I'm going to exaggerate, 75% of our job is to get really good at getting money to do things.

Lindsay Pedersen:

How to position the positioning, how to position the allocation of dollars so that it's going to appeal to a variety of different thinking styles of leaders?

Adriana Gil Miner:

I mean, it is one of the most interesting parts of the job because your investment in marketing in any company is usually a reflection of your business strategy and so it has to be tied to that. And it is the biggest variable that you have in a company in terms of expense. So you have your office space, your human resources, those are all pretty steady. You plan to hire a hundred people more or less what the average salary.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Fixed expenses.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Exactly. But marketing dollars are highly variable. So it is the most variable and most unpredictable expense in a company, typically. So you have to be extra strategic of where you put that because that's your engine. That's your engine for growth. And so I embrace that challenge and I love it because it's so interesting to me that dollar, how much you invest in marketing is directly... It's again, a reflection of what your business strategy is. Think really good strategic CMOs, understand that link and very much are able to articulate how does this help the overall business strategy and what is the business strategy and why we need to do all that.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Right. I love the analogy of the engine that marketing is the engine. It's the thing that's creating and capturing demand and therefore revenue, the lifeblood of the organization is perpetuated by this engine because I think, and I'm not a car person, but if I take this analogy, you can take good care of your car or not good care of your car. You can do things that will enable your car to perform well for 250,000 miles, or you can do things that I know that when somebody is leasing a car, they often treat the car or renting a car, they treat the car more poorly, but if you take really good care, it'll take good care of you. So there's also sort of this short term, long term, in the short term, we need it to run, but in the long term we also need it to run. So we need to take good care of it today.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Yeah, exactly. And I mean, you can do some very interesting things. If you have an old car, you shined it up and then you put a new engine.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Suddenly, it performs like a new car. So I know that you've hugely worked in software, but you've also got deep experience in other industries. I know you worked in financial services, American Express. Do you see differences industry to industry in the idea of what we've been talking about, sort of the portfolio approach to marketing budget allocation, that it's not just performance, it's not just top of funnel, it's a healthy blend. Is that something that is different across industries?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Yes. I would say the fundamental difference between all these, my experience and financial services, and I see it a lot again in B2C, but consumers, is that marketing is a strategic function. So when I was an American Express, for example, I guess in the tech world, you would be considered more of a GM or you were literally responsible for P&L, you had all financial responsibilities. It wasn't like, "Oh, the product," the marketing is the product. And in the case of American Express talk about brand experience, Amex relies on that superior service. It's a club, right? In fact, it's called card members, not card holders, card members. And that was a very deliberate feel. It's a club you want to belong in and if you think about it, to me, actually the credit card industry, sorry, I'm going to go in this rabbit hole for a sec.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Oh, I love rabbit holes.

Adriana Gil Miner:

This is so interesting.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Go for it.

Adriana Gil Miner:

To me, the credit card industry is the smartest business process and brand applications to the stupidest business model ever. If you break it down, Amex for example, had I think offer an incredibly service value-added service when they were Pony Express, and I'm not kidding, this is part of orientation. They actually show you the video like, "We were Pony Express." And if you think about it, the transportation of money from coast to coast was very dangerous. So you needed trained forces and the rider, and then there was a lot of danger and you were carrying money, you were going to get robbed. So of course you're going to pay a percentage of the money that you're giving to the Pony Express to take to the other cops. Why wouldn't you pay a percentage? That's added, cool.

150 years later then Pony Express, it's literally a computer little code that transfers things digitally. There is no... I mean, okay, maybe you have some danger, but there's not that much danger. So it's a pretty, that's what I mean about the stupid, not stupid, but it's a pretty basic service that credit cards provide in the world, and they get a percentage, one to 3% of every transaction you have. It's like crazy money.

So what's the added value? Well, then you have, I think, America Express is fantastic at this, and I'm a loyal card member, and because I experienced it myself, and it's because they take care of you and their brand of service. For example, when I joined the company, our onboarding, they send you to the support in Florida, the call center, and you spend there a week, you listen in and you really...

That's how we train. I tell you, my parents got robbed once in Spain and they had passport money, everything was gone. They had just arrived from the airport. They were at a plaza waiting for the hotel check-in, and they got robbed. And I told them, my mom somehow remembered my cell phone and call me up and I told her, "Go to an American Express travel office and I will wire you money."

And instantly, no ID, just her voice and all this stuff, and not because I was an employee, I just called the 800 number, explained the situation. They told me, "Okay, go here and we will give them money and support and all that stuff." And I was like, "My God, that is what a amazing experience is." I will forever, forever be an American Experience Card member for that situation. They come through when you need it.

Lindsay Pedersen:

wow.

Adriana Gil Miner:

And that I've had other situations, but that's why I admire the company. And I was so thankful to have good five years plus three years of them being my client, being part of an amazing brand. And when I say a brand, it's not just, like I said, it's not just a service of the card. And yes, there's a lot of great events and all this stuff, but it is how they live their values is how they treat their car members.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Wow.

Adriana Gil Miner:

That's why I'm like, rabbit hole. I'm like, it's a perfect sample of how that comes together, but I forgot what you asked me.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Oh, that was beautiful. Well, kind of industry to industry, how these ideas transcend, and some industries, there's more consciousness of what a valuable tool brand is than in other industries.

Adriana Gil Miner:

That's the thing that, I mean, frankly, I struggle a little bit with, especially in the tech world, and I heard hear a lot of CMOS with the same thing is that the conception of what marketing is or what brand is, it's very limited. It's like, "Oh, they're really talking about the managing of the generation and all that stuff. That's what they're thinking."

That is true, and it's a core part of what we do, but it's a sliver versus thinking about the customer experience as a whole. And again, brand is built on all of those touch points, so I don't think that that's the biggest difference. And so in tech, people think about sales led, which is absolutely important part of the business, but you cannot scale with the sales led motion.

And so I think that many companies underestimate the value of marketing by boxing it in, limiting it, and not really thinking about the customer experience and how you build the brand and how you bring that whole... Unless they have a PLG business, if they have a PLG business, they get it. They tend to get it more. But if it's more enterprise software or enterprise in the tech world, it is very much a sales led go-to-market motion, which it is facing a lot of challenges in terms of scale and efficiency and things like that.

So I think we're in a bit of crisis in the software world. Tech's also trying to figure out, when I say a go to market crisis, because trying to figure out what are the better routes to market because we are all having challenges with the sort of what's been the last, I would call it 15 years of acquisition sales. All those things are very much in crisis now because our audits, our financials, the markets have changed, the technology have changed, and so everybody's trying to figure out what that next iteration means.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Is the North Star for Iterable helpful during that crisis? Is that something that comes to bear while thinking about what is next?

Adriana Gil Miner:

I don't think I've put it that way or connected those dots, so it's an interesting question. So no, I don't think we've thought about what is our mission, help us define what that is.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Well, it's interesting with Pony Express to American Express, what struck me as you're describing the heritage of the pony driving across the country and the security of that money and peace of mind that goes along with that security, at some point, that quote unquote product became obsolete and it became a computerized generation of money transfer. And yet that peace of mind, that sense of maybe it's now psychological safety as opposed to physical safety is kind of the same as it was when it was Pony Express. So now I'm probably guessing, but with American Express, that evolution actually did use the North Star., Their product is wildly different, but that North Star governs both.

Adriana Gil Miner:

You are absolutely true and best brands in the world that tend to abstract. At some point, there's an abstraction between what your product does and who you are as a company. I think at the beginning you're very tight, your product and your brand in one and becomes a bigger thing. If I think about in Tableau evolution, a lot of that happened. Our product was like, "Oh my God, you can do real time dashboards and visualize data." Yay. And obviously over time, that became commonitized. Tableau did a lot more things, but really what it was, the essence of Tableau was data to the people in our mission help you see and understand data.

And it was really that empowerment. We fundamentally believe that every person is a data analyst, every professional, and you need data for everything, just like we need to learn how to write and how to add things and do math, we all need to learn how to communicate with data because it's a fundamental part of just being a professional. And that abstraction is what costs much bigger. And again, in the world of software, it could be very ephemeral, but you also see it in the world of computer electronics.

Think about what a Sony is, or another great story is Polaroid. Again, there was an abstraction of what Polaroid stood for, which allowed them to go through so many cycles. I mean, I don't know, I think this is the seventh company that they go through. It's like it's just a logo. So it is an interesting process about, and I think reflection for all of us, where are we in that journey? And to your point, dig into is the essence of your brand, whether that's your mission or your value, the survivor, you define that helping you or hurting you or guiding you in the business decisions you make. I think it's a good, see, I'm going to take that back.

Lindsay Pedersen:

This has been so fun. Adri, I have some rapid fire questions for you. Just one word answers. Are you ready?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Okay.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Okay. What book, movie or TV show changed your life?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Book? Hopscotch. It's a novel that you can start from any part and you never end. I still never, I have never finished. It's a classic post-structuralist, comeback.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Oh my gosh. Who's the author?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Julio Cortázar.

Lindsay Pedersen:

And how do you say Hopscotch in Spanish?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Rayuela.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Okay. Okay. Beautiful.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Movie? Well, it's a TV show. I mean, there's so many, it's called The Dark Side of the Heart. It's from the nineties and it's based in a poem. And so anyway, it's a whole thing.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Dark Side of the Heart.

Adriana Gil Miner:

And then more recently it is Battlestar Galactica.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Oh.

Adriana Gil Miner:

Yes, I'm a huge sci-fi nerd. And I think the reason why I'd like it is that because it helps me really think differently about the world and where we're going. And what I love about sci-fi is that it underneath is really human behavior. Battlestar Galactica is so good. I will tell you why, that it changed my life, because I started watching this in my third trimester with my first child. My husband and I used to watch, I couldn't really move from... So we started watching, we were really into it, and it's like seven years or eight years long.

And when I went into labor, I had two episodes left and I had a very long birth experience. And when we came back from the hospital, I hadn't slept in three days. I had a 28 in a half hour birth. And I came back, I was just crazy in that moment, holding my newborn baby, didn't know what to do, I don't think any new parent, you're like, "Oh, wait, what now?" And I'm like, "Honey, we got to watch this. And it was the last episode," I'm not going to say why, but the last episode is mind blowing, and I was in absolute crazy mode, haven't slept, new baby, but of course, I watched those two episodes and I just had this moment of... I don't know, I don't know how to call it, but it was like when you have this feeling of everything is connected in the world, and all of a sudden for a few seconds, the entire world made sense to me.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Oh my God.

Adriana Gil Miner:

I don't know how to describe it, but I had another world's spirit.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Like a psilocybin trip or a...

Adriana Gil Miner:

Yeah, I was probably very not awake, but it was great, and so I remember this thing and I think I was holding this new baby, this new life in my arms watching this thing, and it's just like I had this moment and it's an incredible feeling of we're all connected and everything, it's all together and all of the lives, all of the time is right in this moment.I don't know why. So yeah. Anyway, crazy experience.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Mic drop.

Adriana Gil Miner:

I bet you didn't expect that.

Lindsay Pedersen:

I did not.

Adriana Gil Miner:

If my husband hears it, he's like, "Why are you talking about this?"

Lindsay Pedersen:

I'm speechless. Amazing. Okay. Thank you. What time do you usually wake up in the morning?

Adriana Gil Miner:

6:45. Okay. Really, 7:30.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Okay.

Adriana Gil Miner:

But on the weekends, 10 A.M. 6:45, 7:30/10. Okay, I'll say 7:30.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Okay. What is your favorite salty snack?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Ooh, salty snack popcorn.

Lindsay Pedersen:

How do you take your coffee or tea or neither?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Cappuccino, skim milk. Half a sugar.

Lindsay Pedersen:

What is your favorite season of the year?

Adriana Gil Miner:

It is the end of summer, really, that space when it's still warm, but the light sun is lower, and so the shadows are very long, and I just love that light of that transition into fall.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Oh, beautiful. Adri, this has been so amazing. Thank you for joining me on the show. How do people stay in touch with you if they want to learn more on social or on whatever they want to know more about Adri?

Adriana Gil Miner:

Best way is LinkedIn, because I gave up X or Twitter or those things.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Yeah. Me too.

Adriana Gil Miner:

It kind of feels kind of weird and yucky to do it. And I'm still on Instagram, but I have been pretty quiet because I don't know if you've had this, but my teen girls asked me to stop posting about them because it was their identity, and I was very proud of them for how they're being thoughtful about managing their online. And so all of a sudden I'm like, "Wow, if I can't post about my kids, I have nothing interesting to say."

Lindsay Pedersen:

So LinkedIn, it is.

Adriana Gil Miner:

So LinkedIn it is, I'm kind of reduced to professional posts. Please connect with me in LinkedIn. I am active there and happy to connect with people. It's my great joy.

Lindsay Pedersen:

Awesome. Awesome. Thanks Adri. Thanks for listening to this episode of North Star Leaders. Make sure you don't miss an episode by subscribing on your favorite podcast app. For show notes, transcripts and newsletter signup, visit Ironcladbrandstrategy.com. Please join us again for another episode of North Star Leaders.

Lindsay speaking

About Lindsay

Lindsay Pedersen is a bestselling author and brand strategist with a scientific, growth-oriented approach to brand building. She has advised companies from burgeoning startups to national corporations, including Zulily, Starbucks, T-Mobile, Coinstar, and IMDb.

Her background as a P&L owner at Clorox fostered in Lindsay a deep appreciation for the executive’s charge: increasing the company’s value. There, she led mature, billion-dollar businesses and newly-launched categories, from Clorox Bleach to Armor All to Brita. In each case, she was solely responsible for increasing the business’s value.

Thanks to this executive perspective, Lindsay demands that brands be hard-working, disciplined and rigorous in growing a business. Her brand strategies are tested in the crucible of her proprietary Ironclad Method. Lindsay arms leaders with an empowering understanding of brand, and an ironclad brand strategy to guide choices as they grow.